XSweet posts

XSweet 2.0 – now with math!

We’re pleased to announce the release of XSweet 2.0, Coko’s docx-to-HTML conversion tool. XSweet is a highly customizable, modular tool for converting MS Word files (.docx) into HTML for publishing to the web, or importing into other platforms. Coko uses XSweet to import author Word files into its book production and journals platforms, and XSweet…

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Sprinting for PubSweet

To help guide the incorporation and use of PubSweet into publishers’ infrastructure development, the Coko community participated in a Book Sprint in Cambridge (UK) in June resulting in the book ‘PubSweet – How to Build a Publishing Platform’.  To download, please click here for PDF and here for EPUB. The book was written by using…

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DOCX, XML, HTML, and Publishing Workflows

Most publishing workflows start with an author submitting their manuscript. For better or worse, this manuscript is most often in a docx format, created using Microsoft Word. The docx manuscript is typically used throughout the reviewing and editing process, often shuttled around as an attachment to emails and other communications. Once the manuscript is accepted,…

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Announcing XSweet 1.0

Coko is thrilled to announce the release of XSweet 1.0, a open source suite of XSL tools for transforming the contents of MS Word into HTML and beyond. XSweet was developed to enable the transformation of Word documents (.docx) into digital objects for web publication and improvement. There are many benefits to moving content from…

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Where we are with File Conversion

There has been quite a bit of interest in our HTML-first strategy and how we manage file conversion. The general inquiries start with ‘isn’t converting from MS Word to HTML impossible?’ through to what technologies we use and our general approach. Well, we are pleased to report that conversion from MS Word to HTML isn’t…

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A Typescript for the Web

In the days of the typewriter, a typescript was a typed copy of a work. The typescript copy was used for improving the document through the editorial process – for reviewing, commenting, fact and rights checking, revision etc. For many years, since the advent of desktop publishing, the hand-typed typescript has been replaced by Microsoft Word documents. This…

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